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Intel Briefing – June 2012

(Continued)

Work on Little Cal levee system continues.
The Little Calumet River Basin Development Commission focused on maintenance and getting the final phases of a flood protection project near Gary, Indiana, completed at a meeting May 9. Pumps and gauges along the Little Calumet River are working properly and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said trees within 15 feet of the levee system have been removed. Crews planned to establish turf from the Northcote Bridge to Columbia Avenue in Munster, May 10. An earlier inspection by the Corps found a portion of the berm from Northcote to Columbia Avenue is too wide, so crews planned to make reductions. The executive director told the commission they were working with officials from Lake Station and Hobart as part of the panel’s commitment to examine flooding issues in the entire Lake County watershed. The commission authorized the director to request bids for large repair projects in Gary where a portion of the levee system is now considered deficient.

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Security of industrial control systems questioned at DHS conference.
Operators of America’s power, water, and manufacturing facilities use industrial control systems (ICS) to manage them. However, the security of these systems, increasingly linked with Microsoft Windows and the Internet, is now under intense scrutiny because of growing awareness that they could be attacked and cause massive disruptions. Industrial facility operators are making efforts to follow security procedures, such as using vulnerability-assessment scanning tools to check for needed patches in Windows. However, ICS environments present special problems, said managers who spoke on the topic at a conference organized by the DHS. Currently, energy and manufacturing facilities are being openly warned by DHS and its Industrial Control Systems Computer Emergency Response Team that they are being targeted by attackers who will often try to infiltrate business networks, often through spear phishing attacks against employees, in order to also gain information about ICS operations.

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York County radio jamming stops.
The person responsible for jamming emergency radio transmissions in Maine’s York County has apparently stopped, WMTW 8 Poland Spring reported May 9. The assistant chief of Lebanon’s rescue department said the last interruption occurred April 22 when his transmissions were blocked as he responded to an emergency, delaying ambulance response. He said he immediately contacted the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to try to track the source of the disruptions. The FCC said it has zero tolerance to emergency band jamming, which is against federal law and can draw steep fines. The assistant chief told the Portland Press Herald the jamming “stopped immediately.”

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Jun 1st, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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