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Intel Briefing – May 2012


Elgin trying to identify yellow substance found in Tyler Creek.
Teams in Eglin, Illinois, were trying to identify a yellow substance found in Tyler Creek March 30 and again April 2. Crews spent hours probing storm sewers with video equipment to find a source for the substance but had no luck. The public works superintendent said the substance dilutes very quickly in the water. Crews were able to minimally test a diluted sample but came to no conclusions. The superintendent said his team is assuming it is relatively benign because of how quickly it dilutes in the water. The environmental concern is significant because Tyler Creek runs into the Fox River, where both Elgin and South Elgin pump water for public use. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency was notified of the issue.

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Pilots delayed jet crash to avoid school.
An F/A-18D Hornet Navy fighter jet crashed into an apartment complex near Virginia Beach, Virgina, sending fuel and debris flying and erupting into flames April 6. Both crew members — who ejected at the very last moment to avoid a nearby school — and five civilians on the ground were treated at local hospitals. An eyewitness to the plane crash said that within 200 or 300 yards of where the plane crashed, the aircraft emptied its jet fuel, with its nose up, and crashed into a building at the Mayfair Mews Apartments. At least five buildings were heavily damaged. The Associated Press reported the fire was out, and crews were going through the buildings to check for anyone who may have been injured. One of the pilots was found on the ground, still strapped to his seat, in shock, according to a witness. The crash site is just north of Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia, where the crew is based.

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Fake Verizon emails contain malicious links.
An e- mail that fraudulently claims to come from Verizon Wireless is making the rounds in Wisconsin and could lead to a serious breach of data for consumers who click the links in its text, Agri-view reported April 6. The fake Verizon Wireless account e-mail has been sent to citizens and to businesses. The sender, subject, graphics, and text are nearly identical to an actual Verizon message. The scam e-mail claims the recipient owes a large amount of money on a Verizon account – current versions say more than $900. When a person clicks any of the links in the e-mail to learn more, they may unintentionally download malicious software onto the computer or be driven to a site that will harvest personal information. Verizon Wireless notes on its Web site that the company does not send e-mail notices asking for customer payment information, usernames, or passwords used to manage accounts.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on May 1st, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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