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Intel Briefing – April 2012

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Expert panel: 10-mile evacuation zone may not be adequate for some nuclear power plants.
The United States should customize emergency plans for each of the nation’s 65 nuclear power plants, a change that in some cases could expand the standard 10-mile evacuation zone in place for more than 3 decades, an expert panel recommended in a report that was to be released March 9. That’s one of the lessons to emerge in a 40-page report set to be released 3 days before the 1-year anniversary of Japan’s nuclear disaster from a committee that examined the incident for the American Nuclear Society. The panel included a former chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a fellow at a Department of Energy laboratory, and seven other nuclear scientists. The report concluded U.S. nuclear power oversight is adequate to protect public health and safety but that emergency zones ―should not be based on arbitrary mileage designations.‖ Under rules in force since 1978, communities near nuclear plants must prepare federally reviewed evacuation plans for those living within 10 miles of the facility.

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How Anonymous plans to use DNS as a weapon.
After engaging in a recent rash of attacks in retaliation for the takedown of file-sharing site Megaupload, the Anonymous’s denial of service tools have not been as active. Disappointed with the current denial of service tools at their disposal, members of Anonymous are working to develop a next-generation attack tool that will, among other options, use the Domain Name System (DNS) itself as a weapon. The scale and stealthiness of the technique, called DNS amplification, is its main draw for Anonymous. DNS amplification hijacks an integral part of the Internet’s global address book, turning a relatively small stream of requests from attacking machines into a torrent of data sent to the target machines.

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Metro knew of brake problems for years, transit officials say.
Washington Metro Transit Authority (Metro) in Washington, D.C., knew for 6 years that some of its rail cars have brake parts that fail sooner than expected, transit officials said March 8. The failure was found in some of the agency’s newest rail cars in 2006. Most of the defective parts have been replaced, but 184 cars with similar parts are in service, according to Metro. The transit authority plans to begin replacing the parts — known as “brake disc hubs” — in the summer. In January and December 2011, brake parts fell from trains in two incidents. The December 2011 incident, which occurred during morning rush hour, shut down service along the downtown core of the Orange and Blue lines for hours.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Apr 2nd, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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