• slide-1
  • slide-2


Intel Briefing – March 2012

(Continued)

65 Campylobacter infections now tied to raw milk dairy.
An additional five cases have bumped up the number of confirmed Campylobacter infections linked to raw milk produced by the Your Family Cow dairy in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, to 65, the Pennsylvania Department of Health reported February 13. The latest breakdown of illnesses by state are: Pennsylvania (56); Maryland (4), West Virginia (3) and New Jersey (2). Unpasteurized milk in two unopened bottles from the dairy tested positive for the outbreak strain, according to Maryland health officials. After making some improvements to its equipment, the Family Cow dairy was cleared by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture to resume selling raw milk the week of February 6.

…………………………………………………………………………

DEP halts fracking at site after gas well failure.
A natural gas well in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, released waste fluids to a Forest Lake Township well pad the week of January 30, leading state regulators to halt all activity at the site. Two valves failed during fracking at Carrizo Marcellus’ Baker 4H well January 30, according to a state department of environmental protection (DEP) spokeswoman and a violation report. Company officials said they were injecting water and sand without chemical additives at the time of the failure. The DEP did not release an estimate of how much fluid escaped, but said it was flowing out at a rate of about 300 to 400 gallons a minute for less than half an hour..

…………………………………………………………………………

Study: Offshore wind farms at risk from hurricanes.
In the worst case, nearly half the turbines in proposed offshore wind farms along the most vulnerable parts of the Gulf and Atlantic coasts are likely to be destroyed by hurricanes in a 20-year period, a study published February 13 suggests. The study from Carnegie Mellon University says strategies should be considered to protect the reliability of the nation’s electricity grid and reduce risks to wind farm operators before large-scale offshore wind development advances in the United States. Mitigation could include choosing different sites or paying more to increase the strength and maneuverability of turbines. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used data from three sites on the Eastern Seaboard and an area off Galveston County, with the latter being the most susceptible to hurricane damage, researchers concluded. A 50-turbine wind farm in Galveston County, Texas, would likely lose 16 turbines in 20 years, researchers found. A main concern is how a grid that is more dependent on wind power would be affected if wind towers buckle in a storm.

<< previous 1 2 3 4

Posted by FanSite on Mar 1st, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

Leave a Reply