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Intel Briefing – November 2011

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Cybercriminals phish for Google AdWords’ user names and passwords.
A new Google AdWords phishing scheme designed to steal user name and password data has been discovered in the wild by M86 Security Labs. The phishing scheme involves a bogus notification e-mail that reads, “Google AdWords: You have a new alert” or ”Google Team: You have a new alert.” The phishing e-mail contains a “dodgy” URL, which the recipient is directed to click on, according to an M86 Security Labs blog. If recipients clicks on the URL, they are directed to a malicious Web page that enables cyber criminals to capture their user name and password for their Google AdWords account, M86 explained. ”Once you enter your Google account credentials in the phishing page this will NOT just compromise your Google AdWords account, but all your Google services like GMail or Google+ will be affected as well. When you receive these sorts of notification emails, always double check the URL before you click on them –- if it looks suspicious, it probably is,” the blog advised.

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More safety issues raised at Oak Ridge plant.
During a dismantlement project at the Y-12 nuclear weapons plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, August 9, a “large” weapons component came loose from its lifting apparatus and fell about 4 feet to the floor, the Knoxville News Sentinel reported October 6. Nobody was injured, the component was not damage, and a plant spokeswoman said there was no way the bomb part could have detonated. “The components processed at Y-12 are not at risk of exploding,” said the spokeswoman, from B&W Y-12, the government’s contractor. The incident was characterized as a “near miss.” However, it is among a number of safety-related problems that have attracted the attention of a federal safety board in recent months. In another newly released report, staff of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) said that 18 drums of nuclear weapons parts were improperly stored at Y-12 for months, violating nuclear criticality rules.

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Thieves steal 50-foot bridge in Western Pa.
Pennsylvania State Police said thieves snuck away with a 50-foot steel bridge. A state police spokesman said in a report filed October 6 that the bridge in North Beaver Township was stolen sometime between September 27-October 5. According to CBS affiliate KDKA, the 20-foot wide bridge was in a wooded area along a railroad line, about 60 miles north of Pittsburgh. Police said it was made out of corrugated steel and valued at about $100,000. The thieves used a blowtorch to cut the bridge apart. They presumably aim to sell it for scrap metal.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Nov 1st, 2011 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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