• slide-1
  • slide-2


New Orleans: A Tale Of 2 Cities Since Katrina

(Continued)

“I’m going to be honest with you,” he went on. “It sucks here. Just look across the street. Nothing. Look over there. Nothing.”

In many ways, New Orleans has come back stronger than ever since Katrina. The restaurant scene is thriving. The hotels are packed. The Superdome has received a glamorous makeover. The French Quarter rocks into the wee hours night after night.

But, as the Big Easy prepared to host the party-slash-national holiday it does like no other, Super Bowl Sunday, it’s worth remembering that life has not yet returned to normal for everyone here.

Not even close.

“It’s like a tale of two cities,” said Mike Miller, who works with the homeless group Unity of Greater New Orleans. “It’s hard to believe that seven years later, it still looks like this.”

Just a short ride from the French Quarter, in historic neighborhoods such as Treme and the Ninth Ward, it’s not hard to find a virtual time capsule from the days when Katrina roared ashore. On block after block, there are structures that look pretty much the same as they did after the water receded.

There are the tell-tale markings that show just how high it climbed when the levees cracked – 3 feet on this crumbling house, 5 feet on those remains of a shopping mall, 7 feet on that ghostly apartment complex. Those Xs still mark the date many of them were searched, who did the searching and how many bodies, if any, were found inside.

Where kids once played and neighbors used to hang out together, now all that remains could easily pass for a former war zone.

“It’s just hard to believe that every abandoned house, every abandoned apartment, represents a family that never came back,” Miller said, shaking his head.

Even after all these years, it all looks so familiar to anyone who remembers those horrific images of people clinging to rooftops and huddled on bridges, waiting desperately for help to arrive.

“You can still see,” said Travers Kurr, also with Unity of Greater New Orleans, pointing toward the roof of a boarded-up house, “where people busted out of their attics so they could be rescued.”

Weaver was one of those who barely got out alive.

When Katrina struck, he was looking out a window toward the levee about a block away, the one that was supposed to keep him safe. Instead, he watched it tear apart right before his eyes – and the water come rushing through.

<< previous 1 2 3 4 next >>

Posted by FanSite on Mar 1st, 2013 and filed under News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

Leave a Reply