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NY, NJ Ponder New Boardwalks Without The Boards

By Wayne Parry

SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) – Coastal areas of New Jersey and New York that lost their boardwalks to Superstorm Sandy’s surge are racing to rebuild them in time for tourist season – in some places, without the boards.

For reasons both practical and environmental, some communities are proposing to replace their wooden boardwalks with more durable synthetic materials or even concrete. That is raising objections from those who say nothing else looks, feels or even smells quite like a true wooden boardwalk.

In New York, where Mayor Michael Bloomberg had already decided wooden boardwalks don’t cut it anymore, a group from the Coney Island section of Brooklyn called Friends of the Boardwalk sued last year to block a plan to replace wooden boardwalks with concrete and plastic.

“When hurricanes come through, they don’t ask whether it’s concrete or wood,” said Todd Dobrin, the group’s leader, not convinced concrete boardwalks would withstand a storm any better than wood.

“They destroy whatever is in their path.”

While “Under the Polymerwalk” might not have the same ring to it as the Drifters’ 1960s hit “Under The Boardwalk,” New York City parks officials say concrete sections of boardwalk in Queens’ Rockaways and Coney Island did hold up much better when Sandy hit in late October.

Bloomberg has long wanted to move away from the tropical hardwoods, harvested from endangered rainforests, that were used to build many boardwalks.

That is an issue Tim Keating, director of Rainforest Relief, has been working on for years. He says coastal communities will be under pressure to quickly rebuild but urges them to resist the temptation to use tropical wood such as ipe, which is cheaper than synthetic materials and popular for its durability. Belmar is considering ipe for its boardwalk reconstruction.

Keating says durable synthetic materials are the best choice for boardwalks; Belmar, Spring Lake, Point Pleasant Beach and other places already used it.

Manasquan, N.J., for decades has paved its beachfront walkway with asphalt. Yet that, too, gets trashed by major storms. A 1992 nor’easter smashed large sections of it, and Sandy wrecked about half of it.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Jan 2nd, 2013 and filed under News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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