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US Air Force Struggles With Aging Fleet

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IKE’S LEGACY – THE KC-135 STRATOTANKER
The U.S. probably couldn’t have fought the air wars over Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya without the KC-135 Stratotanker, the Air Force’s main aerial refueler, which allows fighter jets to remain airborne on long flights.

America has President Dwight Eisenhower to thank for that.

The KC-135 came into service during Eisenhower’s watch in 1956. The newest of the roughly 400 Stratotankers in service started flying nearly half a century ago, in 1964.

“We are in unknown territory,” said Lt. Col. Brian Zoellner, who has been flying the KC-135 for 15 years and is head of operations for 909th Air Refueling Squadron at Kadena Air Base on Japan’s southwestern island of Okinawa. “The unknown is at what point does the KC-135 become unusable.”

The KC-46A refueling tanker is being developed as a replacement, but probably won’t start delivery for another five years. If Congress has its way, some Stratotankers could still be taking off well into the 2040s.

THAT ’70s SHOW _ THE F-15, F-16 AND A-10
The F-15, America’s workhorse warplane since the Vietnam War, was designed to have a service life of about 5,000 flight hours. The Air Force has more than tripled that, to 18,000 hours.

The F-16, another key fighter, has been in use since 1979. The Air Force began retiring the oldest ones two years ago.
Another ’70s-era fighter is the A-10 Thunderbolt, which provides close air support for ground troops. It’s now being rewinged because its old ones were riddled with cracks. The General Accounting Office estimates the cost of upgrading and refurbishing the aircraft will be $2.25 billion through 2013.

The Air Force is revamping its fighter fleet with the stealthy F-22 Raptor and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, but production of the F-22 was cut short after its price tag swelled to nearly half a billion dollars a pop. Delays and escalating costs have also dogged the F-35, which is now the most expensive Department of Defense
procurement program ever.

SPY PLANES FROM THE ’50s – THE U-2
The fabled U-2 “Dragon Lady” spy plane is still being used to keep watch over North Korea and other hot spots. The first U-2 flew in 1955, and the legendary Skunk Works aircraft became a household name for its role in the Cuban missile crisis, not to mention the propaganda bonanza the Soviet Union got by shooting one down in 1960 and capturing its CIA pilot, Francis Gary Powers.

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Posted by FanSite on Dec 1st, 2012 and filed under Techline. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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