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Intel Briefing – November 2012

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New security threat at work: Bring- your-own-network.
Even as IT pros wrestle with the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend, corporate security is being further complicated by another emerging trend: bring your own network (BYON). BYON is a byproduct of increasingly common technology that allows users to create their own mobile networks, usually through mobile wireless hotspots. Security professionals say BYON requires a new approach to security because some internal networks may now be as insecure as consumer devices. An attorney with the law firm Much Shelist said BYON represents a more dangerous threat to data security than employees who bring their own smartphones or tablets into the office. ―The network thing blows this up completely, because it takes the data out of the network the company protects,‖ he said.

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Feds investigate steering in Hyundai Santa Fe.
U.S. safety regulators are investigating a steering problem in Hyundai Santa Fe sport utility vehicles (SUV), the Associated Press reported October 12. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said a fastener can come loose, causing the steering shaft to come apart and drivers to lose control of the vehicle. The investigation covers about 70,000 Santa Fes from the 2011 model year. It will determine if the problem is bad enough for Hyundai to recall the SUVs. NHTSA said one driver complained about a complete loss of steering. Hyundai also received a complaint that a loose bolt caused a similar problem.

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Japan’s TEPCO admits downplaying tsunami risk.
The operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan admitted October 12 it played down the risks of a tsunami to the facility for fear of the financial and regulatory costs. The report said that before the huge waves of March 2011 smashed into the plant, the company was aware defenses against natural disasters were not sufficient but did not act because of the possible consequences. ―There was a latent fear that plant shutdown would be required until severe accident measures were put in place,‖ Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said in a report. The company document, entitled ―Fundamental Policy for the Reform of TEPCO Nuclear Power Organization‖, said insufficient planning was done to prepare for a natural disaster at the plant.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Nov 1st, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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