• slide-1
  • slide-2


Intel Briefing – November 2012

(Continued)

U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA cites Bedford Park, Ill.-based Hoist Liftruck for 25 safety and health violations.
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration October 4 cited Hoist Liftruck Manufacturing Inc. in Bedford Park, Illinois, with 25 safety and health — including 4 repeat — violations. A safety inspection was opened in April and a health inspection was opened in May. Proposed fines totaled $82,170. The repeat violations involved failing to provide welding curtains, and conduct fit testing and medical evaluations for workers required to wear respirators. Similar violations were cited in 2007. Eighteen serious safety violations involved failing to develop and implement a confined space program, train forklift drivers and evaluate them every 3 years, properly store flammable containers, provide personal protective equipment, and adequately train workers on hazard communication. Three other-than-serious violations were also cited.

…………………………………………………………………………

Bing is the most heavily poisoned search engine, study says.
Bing search results are more affected by poisoning than those of other search engines, according to a study by SophosLabs. Search engine poisoning attacks are designed to skew results so that dodgy sites — anything from malware infected Web sites to payday loan sites — appear prominently in the index of sites related to popular search terms. In many cases, the tactic is so successful that malware sites appear in the first page of results for popular search terms, sometimes much higher than legitimate Web sites. More recently, miscreants began trying to manipulate image search results.

…………………………………………………………………………

U.S. charges 530 in mortgage probe with $1 billion in losses.
The United States brought charges against 530 people over mortgage schemes that cost homeowners more than $1 billion, the Attorney General said October 9. More than 73,000 homeowners were victims of various frauds for which charges were filed during a year-long crackdown, including “foreclosure rescue schemes” that take advantage of those who have fallen behind on payments, the Justice Department said in a statement. Typical schemes involved promises to homeowners that foreclosures could be prevented by payment of a fee, according to the statement. As part of the schemes, “investors” purchase the mortgage or the titles of homes are transferred to those taking part in the fraud, resulting in homeowners losing their property, the department said.

<< previous 1 2 3 4 next >>

Posted by FanningCommunications on Nov 1st, 2012 and filed under Intel Brief. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

Leave a Reply