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Common Type Of Rail Car Has Dangerous Design Flaw

By Jason Keyser

FILE - In this June 21, 2009 file photo, railroad freight cars are seen destroyed after a fiery explosion that killed one person are next to the train tracks following a derailment June 19 in Rockford, Ill. For two decades, one of the nation’s most common types of rail tanker, known as a DOT-111, has been allowed to haul hazardous liquids from coast to coast even though transportation officials were aware of a dangerous design flaw that almost guarantees the car will tear open in an accident. The rail and chemical industries have committed to a safer design for new tankers, but they do not want to modify tens of thousands of existing cars. That’s despite a spike in the number of accidents. (AP Photo/Rockford Register Star, Scott Morgan, File)

CHICAGO, Ill. (AP) – For two decades, one of the most commonly used type of rail tanker has been allowed to haul hazardous liquids from coast to coast even though transportation officials were aware of a dangerous design flaw that almost guarantees the car will tear open in an accident, potentially spilling cargo that could catch fire, explode or contaminate the environment.

The rail and chemical industries have committed to a safer design for new tankers but are pressing regulators not to require modifications to tens of thousands of existing cars, despite a spike in the number of accidents as more tankers are put into service to accommodate soaring demand for ethanol, the highly flammable cornbased fuel usually transported by rail.

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Posted by FanningCommunications on Oct 1st, 2012 and filed under News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response by filling following comment form or trackback to this entry from your site

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